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AngioVac system for infective endocarditis: A new treatment for an old disease


1 Department of Anesthesiology; Department of Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida, United States
2 Department of Anesthesiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida, United States
3 Department of Internal Medicine; Department of Infectious Disease, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida, United States
4 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida, United States

Correspondence Address:
Salomon D Poliwoda
4300 Alton Rd. Miami Beach FL 33154
United States
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.aca_156_21

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Year : 2023  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 105-108

 

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Three different patients presented to our institution with right-sided infective endocarditis (IE). All three were found to have vegetation on the tricuspid valve. These patients were started on appropriate antimicrobial therapy according to their blood cultures sensitivities. Despite this management, the patients' clinical status did not improve solely on antimicrobials. Surgery was, therefore, indicated to remove the vegetations. Traditionally, the appropriate management would have been invasive surgery. However, these patients were subjected to a novel treatment in our institution for right-sided IE: percutaneous mechanical vegetation debulking with an AngioVac system. After this procedure, all three patients' clinical status improved drastically. This new less invasive approach seems to offer the same results as the traditional invasive surgery, with faster recovery time. More comparative studies are needed to confirm this idea.






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1 Department of Anesthesiology; Department of Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida, United States
2 Department of Anesthesiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida, United States
3 Department of Internal Medicine; Department of Infectious Disease, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida, United States
4 Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Mount Sinai Medical Center, Miami Beach, Florida, United States

Correspondence Address:
Salomon D Poliwoda
4300 Alton Rd. Miami Beach FL 33154
United States
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/aca.aca_156_21

Rights and Permissions

Three different patients presented to our institution with right-sided infective endocarditis (IE). All three were found to have vegetation on the tricuspid valve. These patients were started on appropriate antimicrobial therapy according to their blood cultures sensitivities. Despite this management, the patients' clinical status did not improve solely on antimicrobials. Surgery was, therefore, indicated to remove the vegetations. Traditionally, the appropriate management would have been invasive surgery. However, these patients were subjected to a novel treatment in our institution for right-sided IE: percutaneous mechanical vegetation debulking with an AngioVac system. After this procedure, all three patients' clinical status improved drastically. This new less invasive approach seems to offer the same results as the traditional invasive surgery, with faster recovery time. More comparative studies are needed to confirm this idea.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
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